Praise Series

English (34) | Deutsch (6) | Español (5) | Français (3) | Italiano (1) | Nederlands (2) | བོད་ཡིག (34)


Further Information:

Saluting them with an endless ocean of praise,

With the sounds of an ocean of different melodies

I sing of the buddhas’ noble qualities,

And praise all those who have gone to perfect bliss.

A selection of praises (Skt. stotra; Tib. bstod pa) to various Buddhist deities and prominent masters (arranged according to subject):

General

Buddha Śākyamuni

Fourteenth Dalai Lama

Guru Padmasambhava

Longchen Rabjam

Lords of the Three Families

Mañjuśrī

Mārīcī

Milarepa

Sacred Places

This is a poetic guide to the sacred site of Yangleshö (yang le shod) near the village of Pharping to the south of the Kathmandu Valley, where it is said that Guru Padmasambhava attained the level of a Mahāmudrā vidyādhara. Jamyang Khyentse wrote the text following a series of visionary experiences; it has the quality of a revelation and ends with a series of cryptic prophecies.

Verses in praise of three sacred sites: Rājgṛha (rgyal po'i khab), the ancient capital of Magadha; Vulture Peak (bya rgod spungs ri), where Buddha taught the Prajñāpāramitā sūtras; and Nālandā (nālendra), site of the famous monastic university.

A panegyric on Devāvatāra or Sāṃkāśya, the place where Buddha supposedly returned to earth after spending a rainy season teaching Abhidharma to his mother and others in the deva realm.

A short poetic text in praise of Kuśinagara, the scene of Buddha Śākyamuni's final act, passing beyond this world and into parinirvāṇa.

Although entitled a praise of Vārāṇasī, this short poetic work concerns Sarnath or Ṛṣipatana, located approximately 10 kilometres from that ancient city. It was in the deer park of Sarnath that Buddha Śākyamuni first taught, setting in motion the Wheel of Dharma.

Verses in praise of the sacred site of Yangleshö (yang le shod) near the village of Pharping to the south of the Kathmandu Valley, where it is said that Guru Padmasambhava attained the level of a Mahāmudrā vidyādhara.

In this verse text, probably composed in 1958, Jamyang Khyentse playfully marvels at modernity and expresses a sense of wonder upon encountering the vast Indian city of Kolkata and all its unfamiliar attractions for the first time. The real highlight of the city as he sees it, however, is the chance to view the Buddha's relics, which were housed at the Indian Museum.

A short poetic text in praise of Śrāvastī (mnyan yod), where Buddha Śākyamuni spent many rainy seasons and where, it is said, he defeated rival teachers in a contest of miraculous ability. Jamyang Khyentse composed the work during a visit to the town in 1956.

Tso Pema (mtsho padma) or 'Lotus Lake' in Rewalsar, Northern India is identified with a lake in the ancient kingdom of Zahor, which was created, it is said, when the king and his ministers attempted to burn Guru Padmasambhava and his consort Mandāravā alive. The master transformed his funeral pyre into a lake, where he appeared, unharmed and seated upon a lotus.

Jamyang Khyentse composed this poem in praise of Lumbinī, the site of Buddha's birth and a major place of pilgrimage, during a visit in the late 1950s.

A short laudation of Vulture Peak Mountain (bya rgod phung po'i ri bo; Gṛdhrakūta), located in modern Bihar state in India, and renowned as the site at which Buddha taught the Prajñāpāramitā.

Śāntarakṣita

Sarasvatī

Trisong Detsen

Vajrasattva

Vajrayoginī

Tārā

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