Chokling Tersar Series

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Chokgyur Dechen Lingpa

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Texts related to the Chokling Tersar (mchog gling gter gsar), the New Treasures of Chokgyur Lingpa (1829–1870):

Advice

Aspiration Prayers

Biography

Chöd

Commentaries

Confession

Guru Yoga

History

Lineage Prayers

Prayers

This famous prayer to Guru Padmasambhava for the elimination of all obstacles on the spiritual path is the outer practice of The Guru's Heart Practice: Dispelling All Obstacles on the Path (bla ma'i thugs sgrub bar chad kun sel), a joint revelation of Chokgyur Dechen Lingpa and Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo.

Popularly known as Dü Sum Sangye (Dus gsum sangs rgyas), this short prayer to Guru Padmasambhava was discovered as a treasure (gter ma) by Chokgyur Dechen Lingpa. As indicated in the colophon, it was—and still is—regarded as especially pertinent for the current time.

Chokgyur Dechen Lingpa’s revelation of the Sampa Lhundrupma (bsam pa lhun grub ma), a famous prayer to Guru Padmasambhava for the spontaneous fulfilment of wishes, forms the outer section of The Guru’s Heart Practice: The Wish-Fulfilling Jewel (thugs sgrub yid bzhin nor bu). The prayer is very similar to Tulku Zangpo Drakpa’s Sampa Lhundrupma prayer, which is counted as the final chapter of the Le’u Dünma or Prayer in Seven Chapters.

As stated in the colophon this prayer to the Guru of Oḍḍiyāna is extracted from a biography which Chokgyur Lingpa revealed as a treasure (gter ma) at Karmé Damchen Drak (karma'i dam can brag).

This short prayer to Chokgyur Lingpa invokes the great tertön by means of three different names: Chokgyur Lingpa, Dechen Lingpa, and Zhikpo Lingpa.

Sādhanas

This concise practice of Guru Dewa Chenpo (gu ru bde ba chen po), the Guru of Great Bliss, was revealed as a terma by Chokgyur Lingpa and transcribed by Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Thaye at Tsurpu Monastery.

Khyentse Rinpoche composed this simple sādhana of Vajrasattva by adapting a section of the Tukdrup Sheldam Nyingjang (thugs sgrub zhal gdams snying byang), the root text of the Barche Kunsel revelation of Chokgyur Dechen Lingpa.

This concise ritual for cultivating the pure realm of Amitābha was arranged by Jamgön Kongtrul based on Chokgyur Lingpa’s Amitābha sādhana from the Essence Manual of Oral Instructions (zhal gdams snying byang). The practice forms the sixth of eleven modes of liberation in Kongtrul's Wondrous Ocean: An Elucidation of the Application of the Eleven Modes of Liberation of the Sambhogakāya, Tamer of Beings (longs sku 'gro 'dul gyi las rim grol ba bcu gcig gi lag len gsal byed ngo mtshar rgya mtsho).

A short daily practice of Dükyi Shechen (bdud kyi gshed chen)—The Great Demon-Slayer—from the Tukdrup Barche Kunsel (‘Dispelling All Obstacles’) cycle of the Chokling Tersar.

According to the colophon, this elaborate ritual for cultivating the pure realm of Amitābha was compiled by Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo at the passing of Chokgyur Lingpa’s mother, Tsering Yangtso. Taking Chokgyur Lingpa’s treasure Amitābha sādhana from the Essence Manual of Oral Instructions (zhal gdams snying byang) as a basis, Khyentse Wangpo added further instructions and verses, primarily from The Array of Amitābha Sūtra (Toh 49, 'od dpag med kyi bkod pa) and The King of Aspiration Prayers (bzang spyod smon lam).

Sur Offering

Tsok

Related Topics

Vajrayāna Buddhism places restrictions on the reading and practice of certain texts, which are intended only for those who have received the requisite empowerments, transmissions and instructions.

If you are unsure as to whether you are entitled to read or practice a particular text please consult a qualified lineage-holder.

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