Longchen Nyingtik Series

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Deities of the Longchen Nyingtik

Texts related to the Longchen Nyingtik (klong chen snying thig, Heart Essence of the Vast Expanse) cycle revealed by Rigdzin Jigme Lingpa (1729/30–1798):

Aspiration Prayers

Commentaries

This word-by-word explanation of the Longchen Nyingtik preliminaries draws upon and summarizes earlier commentaries, especially the most celebrated of them all, Patrul Rinpoche's Words of My Perfect Teacher (Kun bzang bla ma'i zhal lung). Yet Chökyi Drakpa's text is not entirely derivative and its relative brevity makes it ideal as a reminder of the most important points of the practice. This is why some lamas recommend reading and studying it regularly, together with the liturgy (which appears in bold).

This is a version of A Profound Concentration of Nectar, into which the root text of the Longchen Nyingtik preliminaries has been inserted. The text also includes several prayers that were not included in Jikmé Trinlé Özer’s original version.

A guide to the approach and accomplishment practices for the guru sādhana known as Vidyādhara Assembly (Rigdzin Düpa), belonging to the Longchen Nyingtik cycle revealed by Jigme Lingpa.

In this brief commentary Gemang Khenpo Yönten Gyatso explains the meaning behind every word of Jigme Lingpa's famous revelation, The Prayer of the Ground, Path and Fruition (gzhi lam 'bras bu'i smon lam).

Patrul Rnpoche's explanations in this brief guide to the Longchen Nyingtik preliminary practices mostly follow those given in his classic text, The Words of My Perfect Teacher (Kun bzang bla ma'i zhal lung). Still, this condensed text offers useful reminders of the most important points of the practice, especially the details of the visualizations.

An explanation of The Vajra Verses on the Natural State, a revelation of Jigme Lingpa, which describes the pure awareness that is the natural state of the mind and how all the qualities of the path and fruition are complete within it.

Confession

Dukngal Rangdrol

A daily sādhana of Dukngal Rangdrol (sdug bsngal rang grol), 'Natural Liberation of Suffering', the Avalokiteśvara practice from the Longchen Nyingtik that is either classed as a peaceful yidam or secret-level guru practice from the peaceful male-vidyādhara section of the cycle.

A detailed description of the deities in the retinue of the Great Compassion One (Mahākaruṇika) according to the practice of Dukngal Rangdrol.

This 'guidance' or nedren (gnas 'dren) practice is intended to help guide the deceased to enlightenment by purifying the various realms of saṃsāra and granting empowerment. It belongs to the Natural Liberation of Suffering (sdug bsngal rang grol) set of Avalokiteśvara practices, which, in turn, are part of the Longchen Nyingtik revelation.

The gaṇacakra feast offering text to accompany the practice of Dukngal Rangdrol (Natural Liberation of Suffering) from the Longchen Nyingtik.

A description of the goddesses in the retinue of the Great Compassion One (Mahākaruṇika) according to the practice of Dukngal Rangdrol.

The sādhana of Dukngal Rangdrol (sdug bsngal rang grol), 'Natural Liberation of Suffering', is the Avalokiteśvara practice from the Longchen Nyingtik that is classed either as a peaceful yidam or as the secret-level guru practice from the peaceful, male-vidyādhara section of the cycle.

In 1758, one year after the first, principal revelation of Dukngal Rangdrol, Jigme Lingpa had a vision of Avalokiteśvara, the Great Compassionate One, in standing posture and extending to the far reaches of the eastern sky. Following this, he tells us in his autobiography, "tears of devotion welled up" and he composed this prayer.

Dzogchen

Lineage Prayers

A collection of short prayers to all the key figures in the lineage of the Heart Essence of the Vast Expanse (Longchen Nyingtik) compiled by Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche for regular recitation in conjunction with any practice from the Longchen Nyingtik cycle.

A prayer to the various masters of the lineage of Vidyādhara Assembly (rig 'dzin 'dus pa), the inner guru sādhana from the Longchen Nyingtik cycle revealed by Jigme Lingpa.

A prayer to the eight great vidyādharas of India who were entrusted with the Kagyé teachings.

A five-verse prayer to the ḍākinīs of the three kāyas and the root and lineage masters.

A prayer to the lineage of Yumka Dechen Gyalmo (yum ka bde chen rgyal mo), or The Queen of Great Bliss, the peaceful ḍākinī sādhana from the Longchen Nyingtik cycle.

In these addenda to the standard lineage prayer for Longchen Nyingtik (klong chen snying thig), which is known as The Continuous Shower of Blessings, Jamyang Khyentse highlights two versions of the lineage received by Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo: the full transmission from Khenpo Pema Vajra and the transmission of realization from Jigme Gyalwe Nyugu.

A lineage supplication for the Vajrasattva guru yoga known as Dorsem Ngön-ga (Abhirati Vajrasattva), which is part of the Longchen Nyingtik revelation.

A prayer to the holders of the lineage of Dukngal Rangdrol ('Natural Liberation of Suffering') from Amitāyus and Avalokiteśvara down to Jamyang Khyentse's own root teacher.

A prayer to the lineage of Yumka Dechen Gyalmo (yum ka bde chen rgyal mo), or The Queen of Great Bliss, the peaceful ḍākinī sādhana from the Longchen Nyingtik cycle.

A short prayer to the lineage of Palchen Düpa, the wrathful yidam practice of Longchen Nyingtik, including supplementary verses composed by the Third Dodrupchen, Jigme Tenpe Nyima.

This prayer to the lineage of Longchen Nyingtik is part of the original revelation and was supplemented by later authors. It includes an aspiration for successfully following the path.

A prayer to the lineage of Takhyung Barwa, a revelation of Jigme Lingpa (1730–1798) that combines the practices of Hayagrīva, Garuḍa and Guru Drakpo, and is renowned for its capacity to subjugate negative forces and cure disease.

Ngöndro

Offerings

Palchen Düpa

This version of the Palchen Düpa sādhana was arranged by Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo from the original revelation for daily use or for when the practice has to be done repeatedly in a single day, such as during a drupchen (sgrub chen). It is of a medium size, shorter than the full revelation but longer than the daily practice which Khyentse Wangpo also compiled.

An abbreviated, daily practice of Palchen Düpa, the Awesome Ones' Assembly, which is the wrathful yidam practice of the Longchen Nyingtik cycle.

Palchen Düpa (dpal chen 'dus pa), the 'Awesome Ones' Assembly', is the wrathful yidam practice of the Longchen Nyingtik cycle. It features the Kagyé (bka' brgyad), or eight herukas, with Chemchok Vajra Tötrengtsal as the central deity.

This brief liturgy for invoking the inspiration power, or blessings, of the eight vidyādharas (rig 'dzin brgyad) of India was extracted from ‘A Precious Casket: A Framework for Accomplishment, from the Ocean-like Assembly of Awesome Ones’ (dpal chen bka' 'dus rgya mtsho las/ sgrub pa'i khog 'bubs rin po che'i za ma tog).

Rigdzin Düpa

Verses for offering 'medicine' (sman), or amṛta, as part of the Rigdzin Düpa (Vidyādhara Assembly) practice from the Longchen Nyingtik.

Verses for offering 'medicine' (sman), or amṛta, as part of the Rigdzin Düpa (Vidyādhara Assembly) practice from the Longchen Nyingtik.

A brief fulfilment (skong ba) practice to be recited as part of the gaṇacakra offering for the Longchen Nyingtik guru practice of Rigdzin Düpa (Vidyādhara Assembly).

Four sets of concealed instructions (gab byang) related to the practice of Rigdzin Düpa (Vidyādhara Assembly), on 1) the wisdom deity, 2) the mantra, 3) the palanquin (do li) samādhi, and 4) the results of the practice.

This longevity practice related to Rigdzin Düpa (The Vidyādhara Assembly) includes a means of attaining immortality through Amitāyus and a summoning of longevity (tshe 'gugs) that invokes the eight vidyādharas.

The inner guru practice Vidyādhara Assembly (Rigdzin Düpa) features Guru Padmasambhava and Mandāravā at the centre of the maṇḍala, surrounded by the eight vidyādharas, twenty-five disciples and other deities.

Takhyung Barwa

Transference (Phowa)

Tsa Lung

Tummo

Vajrasattva

Yumka Dechen Gyalmo

A simple, abbreviated version of the root Yumka Dechen Gyalmo sādhana, which is known as The Glorious Blissful Garland, arranged for daily practice.

A fulfilment (bskang ba) practice to accompany the sādhana of Yumka Dechen Gyalmo, the Queen of Great Bliss, from the Longchen Nyingtik cycle.

A concise gaṇacakra, or feast-offering, liturgy for the practice of Yumka Dechen Gyalmo, the Queen of Great Bliss, from the Longchen Nyingtik, composed at the suggestion of Khenpo Dazer (1922–1990).

Jamgön Kongtrul compiled this empowerment text for Yumka Dechen Gyalmo on the basis of the original treasure revelation, Blessing and Empowerment for the Female Practice. The result is "clear yet concise," as Kongtrul himself put it, and less elaborate than the later arrangement by Dodrupchen Jigme Tenpe Nyima (1865–1926).

A concise gaṇacakra, or feast-offering, liturgy for the practice of Yumka Dechen Gyalmo, the Queen of Great Bliss, from the Longchen Nyingtik.

Yumka Dechen Gyalmo (yum ka bde chen rgyal mo), the Queen of Great Bliss, is the peaceful ḍākinī practice from the Longchen Nyingtik cycle. It features Yeshe Tsogyal in the form of a wisdom ḍākinī.

This source text of the Yumka Dechen Gyalmo empowerment, part of the original treasure revelation of Longchen Nyingtik, served as the basis for later, more elaborate manuals composed by Jamgön Kongtrul and the Third Dodrupchen, Jigme Tenpe Nyima.

Further clarifications on the bodily maṇḍala (lus dkyil) of Yumka Dechen Gyalmo including the correspondence between external and internal sacred places, composed at the request of the female disciple Palding Jetsünma (alias Lhading Jetsün) of Gyangru.

This self-initiation (bdag 'jug) for the practice of Yumka Dechen Gyalmo was composed by Jigme Lingpa himself. Receiving empowerments in this way, he explains, is a means of purifying impairments and breakages of samaya and receiving inspiration and blessings, and should therefore be practised regularly and repeatedly.

A succinct guide to the ḍākinī practice of Yumka Dechen Gyalmo, or Queen of Great Bliss, including details concerning necessary preparations and details of the visualization.

This fulfilment (bskang ba) practice is so rare that it was not included in previous editions of Jigme Lingpa's collected writings but appears only in modern liturgies of Shechen and Namdroling monasteries.

Jigme Lingpa describes how the cycle of Yumka Dechen Gyalmo was first revealed to him by a ḍākinī, while he was on pilgrimage in Drakyi Yangdzong in 1773.

This fire offering for Yuma Dechen Gyalmo, the main ḍākinī practice of Longchen Nyingtik, can be adapted to any of the four activities: pacifying, enriching, magnetizing or wrathful subjugation.

Tārā

Related Topics

Vajrayāna Buddhism places restrictions on the reading and practice of certain texts, which are intended only for those who have received the requisite empowerments, transmissions and instructions.

If you are unsure as to whether you are entitled to read or practice a particular text please consult a qualified lineage-holder.

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