Guru Padmasambhava

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Guru Padmasambhava

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Texts related to the legendary Guru Padmasambhava and his various manifestations:

Guru Yoga

Prayers

An eight-line prayer to Guru Padmasambhava that incorporates the shortest possible summary of his life and an aspiration for rebirth on the Glorious Copper-Coloured Mountain.

A short prayer to Guru Rinpoche as the source and embodiment of all tantric lineages in Tibet, composed at the request of Riwoche Jedrung.

This famous prayer to Guru Padmasambhava for the elimination of all obstacles on the spiritual path is the outer practice of The Guru's Heart Practice: Dispelling All Obstacles on the Path (bla ma'i thugs sgrub bar chad kun sel), a joint revelation of Chokgyur Dechen Lingpa and Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo.

Popularly known as Dü Sum Sangye (Dus gsum sangs rgyas), this short prayer to Guru Padmasambhava was discovered as a treasure (gter ma) by Chokgyur Dechen Lingpa. As indicated in the colophon, it was—and still is—regarded as especially pertinent for the current time.

This famous prayer to Guru Padmasambhava for the spontaneous fulfilment of wishes forms the outer section of The Guru’s Heart Practice: The Wish-Fulfilling Jewel (thugs sgrub yid bzhin nor bu). The prayer is very similar to Tulku Zangpo Drakpa’s Sampa Lhundrupma prayer, which is counted as the final chapter of the Le’u Dünma or Prayer in Seven Chapters. This version of the prayer, without the colophon, appears in volume thirteen of the Compendium of Sādhanas compiled by Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo.

Chokgyur Dechen Lingpa’s revelation of the Sampa Lhundrupma (bsam pa lhun grub ma), a famous prayer to Guru Padmasambhava for the spontaneous fulfilment of wishes, forms the outer section of The Guru’s Heart Practice: The Wish-Fulfilling Jewel (thugs sgrub yid bzhin nor bu). The prayer is very similar to Tulku Zangpo Drakpa’s Sampa Lhundrupma prayer, which is counted as the final chapter of the Le’u Dünma or Prayer in Seven Chapters.

As stated in the colophon this prayer to the Guru of Oḍḍiyāna is extracted from a biography which Chokgyur Lingpa revealed as a treasure (gter ma) at Karmé Damchen Drak (karma'i dam can brag).

This concise biography of the eighth-century master from Uḍḍīyana, Guru Padmasambhava, who established Buddhism in Tibet, was revealed in 1856 by the great treasure-revealer Chokgyur Lingpa as part of the Sevenfold Cycle of Profundity (zab pa skor bdun). The text consists of ten short chapters, each related to a different aspect of the master’s life and activities.

Khyentse Rinpoche invokes the eight manifestations of Guru Rinpoche (gu ru mtshan brgyad) by drawing on key lines from the famous Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti (Chanting the Names of Mañjuśrī).

This prayer to Guru Padmasambhava incorporates the twelve syllables of the Vajra Guru mantra, elaborating upon their meaning in different ways in each of the eight chapters.

A short prayer to Guru Padmākara, written at the request of the late Sharpa Tsenam, who played an important role in the construction of Kyabje Dudjom Rinpoche's Zandokpalri Monastery in Kalimpong.

A short supplication to Guru Padmasambhava combined with an aspiration based on the so-called Four Dharmas of turning one's mind toward the Dharma, making progress on the path, clarifying confusion, and allowing confusion to dawn as wisdom.

This very short prayer to the three kāyas, the dharmakāya Amitābha, sambhogakāya Avalokiteśvara and nirmāṇakāya Guru Padmasambhava, for 'clearing obstacles from the path' (bar chad lam sel) was composed by the treasure-revealer Do Khyentse Yeshe Dorje.

The famous tertön (gter ston) Do Khyentse Yeshe Dorje wrote this brief prayer to Guru Padmasambhava Tötreng Tsal for the spontaneous fulfilment of wishes (bsam pa lhun grub) at the request of his consort and son.

A four-line prayer to Guru Padmasambhava, Longchen Rabjam and Rigdzin Jigme Lingpa.

This prayer of invocation, which was written by the Third Dodrupchen Rinpoche during a period of political unrest, calls upon Guru Padmasambhava to protect Tibetans from aggressors and the ravages of war. More recently, it was redistributed at the behest of Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche, who recognized its continued relevance amid the turmoil of the twentieth century.

This four-line prayer is among the most popular of prayers to Guru Padmasambhava. In the colophon Jigme Trinle Özer records that it was spoken by the Guru himself during a visionary encounter.

A short, four-line supplication to Guru Padmasambhava, embodiment of all the buddhas of the past, present and future.

Dudjom Rinpoche composed this short prayer invoking the Abbot, Master and Dharma-King (Khen Lob Chö Sum), i.e., Śāntarakṣita, Guru Padmasambhava and Trisong Detsen, at Samyé monastery in Tibet at the request of his son, Thinley Norbu Rinpoche.

Dudjom Rinpoche wrote this short prayer when he was engaged in long-life practice at Māratika cave in Nepal, the sacred site where Guru Rinpoche achieved immortality with his consort, Mandāravā.

Dudjom Rinpoche tells us that he wrote this prayer to Guru Rinpoche "for the peace and happiness of the world, at a time when we are all afflicted both physically and mentally by all kinds of outer and inner circumstances."

This popular Sampa Lhundrupma (bsam pa lhun grub ma) prayer to Padmasambhava was revealed as a terma by Dzongter Kunzang Nyima, alias Jigme Nüden Dorje, the grandson and speech incarnation of Dudjom Lingpa (1835–1904).

The Great Fifth Dalai Lama wrote this prayer to Guru Padmasambhava in his eight manifestations, calling upon him to remember his pledge to Tibet and its people, for recitation on the tenth day of each lunar month.

This prayer to Guru Padmasambhava, calling upon him to remember his pledge to come to the aid of Tibet and its people, was composed in 1980 at the request of the cabinet of the Tibetan government-in-exile.

This supplication to Guru Padmasambhava, revealed as a treasure (terma) by the Fourth Shechen Rabjam, has been recommended by the current Rabjam Rinpoche for its special potency in times of crisis.

A simple invocation of Guru Padmasambhava as the unique embodiment of the activity of all the buddhas throughout space and time.

Jamgön Kongtrul wrote this biographical prayer (rnam thar gsol 'debs) to Guru Padmasambhava at the request of Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo. It focuses on the deeds the Precious Guru is said to have performed on the tenth day of each month, when he is commemorated by his followers.

A four-line prayer to Orgyen Dorje Chang—the Vajradhara of Oḍḍiyāna—to purify habitual patterns and realize the clear light of rigpa.

A short supplication of Guru Padmasambhava as the Vajradhara of Oḍḍiyāna (Orgyen Dorje Chang), together with Yeshe Tsogyal and others, written at the behest of a ḍākinī named Lhakar Drolma (possibly to be identified with Lakar Tsering Chödrön).

This prayer was composed in 1956, the Fire Monkey year, at Samye, while Jamyang Khyentse was offering a tsok feast in the presence of the special ‘Looks Like Me’ image of Guru Padmasambhava (gu ru nga 'dra ma) .

A heartfelt prayer to Guru Rinpoche, the precious master of Oḍḍiyāna, who is referred to as the embodiment of all the buddhas' aspirations and the sole ally and protector of the Tibetan people.

Written in 1934/35, this short prayer identifies our own pristine awareness, or rigpa, as Guru Padmasambhava, the Lake-born Vajra (mtsho skyes rdo rje).

Composed in 1919, when Jamyang Khyentse was just twenty-six years old.

A four-line prayer to Guru Padmākara, the embodiment of all gurus, chosen deities and ḍākinīs, for the pacification of obstacles and the spontaneous fulfilment of all wishes.

Written in 1956, this is a prayer to Guru Padmasambhava and his consorts, especially Mandāravā and Yeshe Tsogyal.

An invocation of Guru Padmasambhava as the Vajradhara of Oḍḍiyāna (Orgyen Dorje Chang), embodiment of the five kāyas (dharmakāya, sambhogakāya, nirmāṇakāya, svabhāvikakāya and abhisaṃbodhikāya).

A fervent appeal to the great master of Oḍḍiyāna for the fulfilment of all dharmic aspirations, which Jamyang Khyentse says he composed as a means to refresh his own memory.

A very short, six-line prayer to Guru Padmākara for the elimination of obstacles and fulfilment of wishes.

Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö wrote this prayer in Lhodrak Kharchu on the tenth day of the monkey month in the monkey year (1956)—a point in the Tibetan calendar that holds particular significance for followers of Guru Padmasambhava.

This prayer beautifully summarizes the Padma Kathang (The Chronicles of Padma), one of the most famous and influential of Guru Padmasambhava's many biographies. It reveals how Guru Rinpoche manifests in an infinite variety of forms in order to protect and spread the Buddhadharma.

This brief prayer to Guru Padmākara, which Khyentse Wangpo says came to him spontaneously, includes requests to dispel all obstacles and fulfil all wishes.

These verses to be recited before and after prayers to Guru Padmasambhava, especially the famous Prayer in Seven Chapters (le'u bdun ma), include the practices of taking refuge and arousing bodhicitta, a seven-branch offering, the generation and dissolution of a visualisation, and the dedication of merit.

This poetic prayer relates the Lotus Light (padma 'od) pure realm of Guru Padmasambhava to the four visions of Dzogchen practice and contains the aspiration that we may all be reborn there, to advance through the four stages of a vidyādhara and swiftly reach the level of the Lake-born Guru himself.

This is a complete set of practices, including taking refuge, generating bodhicitta, visualization, invocation, seven-branch offering, heartfelt prayer—addressed to Guru Padmasambhava, his various manifestations and twenty-five disciples—mantra recitation, and dissolution.

A prayer to the Precious Guru of Oḍḍiyāna as the embodiment of all sources of refuge (skyabs gnas kun 'dus) in order to avert all forms of obstacle and hindrance, on the outer, inner and innermost (or 'secret') levels.

Written in 1850, this is a prayer to the guru, who is understood to be inseparable from Guru Padmasambhava and the true nature of mind, and an aspiration to be reborn in the Lotus Light pure realm, if not already liberated during this life or when clear light dawns at the moment of death.

Jigme Lingpa explains why the tenth day of each month is dedicated to Guru Padmasambhava and the benefits of recalling his twelve most significant deeds, which are commemorated on these days throughout the year.

A heartfelt prayer for invoking Guru Padmasambhava—"the great guru of Oḍḍiyāna"—as the embodiment of all sources of refuge and pledging to entrust oneself to him completely in all situations and circumstances, but especially in times of difficulty, during this current degenerate age.

Jigme Lingpa himself describes this text as "a prayer invoking and imploring Guru Rinpoche, coupled with an aspiration prayer suitable for daily recitation based on the root words of the way to attain liberation through the experiences of the bardo states." It was inspired by a sense of sorrow and renunciation when, one morning during a retreat near Samye, Jigme Lingpa glimpsed Mount Hepori in the distance and thought about the great events that had taken place there during Padmasambhava's lifetime, little or no trace of which remained.

A four-line prayer to Guru Padmasambhava requesting the pacification of obstacles and the bestowal of attainments.

This prayer to Guru Padmasambhava for the swift fulfilment of all wishes begins with a verse from ‘The Infinite Cloud Banks of Profound Meaning’ (zab don rgya mtsho'i sprin phung), which is part of Longchen Rabjam’s Khandro Yangtik (mkha' 'gro yang tig), and concludes with several verses written by Jigme Lingpa. It is said to be particularly beneficial for Tibet, as it has the power to pacify illness, prevent famine and border invasions, and contribute to the welfare of the teachings and beings.

One of the most famous four-line prayers to Guru Padmasambhava. It is attributed to Menlungpa Mikyö Dorje, who is also credited with a detailed commentary on the prayer. The final line is often adapted to turn the text into a tea-offering (ja mchod).

The late Minling Chung Rinpoche, Ngawang Chödrak (1908–1980), wrote this plaintive supplication to Guru Rinpoche in 1973, during the cultural revolution.

A simple four-line prayer to the Lotus-born Guru of Oḍḍiyāna for the elimination of all obstacles and the spontaneous fulfilment of all aspirations.

This short text in verse, written in 1902, outlines the twelve major deeds of Guru Padmasambhava, which are to be commemorated in the course of a year—a different deed being recalled on the tenth day of each month.

A short prayer to the eight manifestations of Guru Padmasambhava, eight vidyādharas, eight bodhisattvas, and eight maṇḍalas of Kagye (bka' brgyad). It was composed in 1897.

This prayer in 26 verses recounts the major events of the life of Guru Padmasambhava, from his miraculous birth upon a lotus to his final departure from Tibet for the land of the rakṣasas. Upon recollecting each stage or episode in the Guru's life, the reader requests empowerment and blessings.

This brief Prayer in Seven Chapters (gsol 'debs le'u bdun ma) is said to have been discovered by the great tertön Nyangral Nyima Özer at Samye Monastery.

This prayer to Guru Rinpoche by the eighteenth century master Pawo Lerab Tsal, aka Cheyöl Rigdzin Chenmo, invokes his pledges and commitments (thugs dam) to care for and protect the Tibetan people.

This very short prayer to Guru Padmasambhava, for 'clearing obstacles from the path' (bar chad lam sel) was composed by the treasure-revealer Rangrik Dorje of Nyarong.

This very short prayer to Guru Padmasambhava, for 'spontaneously fulfilling all wishes (bsam pa lhun grub) was composed by the treasure-revealer Rangrik Dorje of Nyarong.

A seven-line prayer to Guru Padmasambhava for the elimination of all obstacles and the fulfilment of all wishes.

This brief invocation, composed at the request of government officials, calls upon Guru Padmasambhava to remember his pledge to come to the aid of Tibet and its people.

A brief prayer to Guru Tsokye Dorje—'Lake-Born Vajra'—for the elimination of all obstacles on the spiritual path.

A brief prayer to Guru Padmasambhava for protection against adversity and the fulfilment of all wishes.

A prayer to Guru Rinpoche recounting eleven significant deeds in his life: 1) forming the enlightened intention to tame beings, 2) descending into the lotus flower, 3) spontaneously taking birth, 4) enjoying the pleasures of a prince, 5) taking ordination, 6) practicing various austerities, 7) overcoming Māra's hosts, 8) attaining complete awakening, 9) turning the wheel of the Dharma, 10) engaging in yogic disciplines, and 11) hiding terma treasures to spread the Dharma far and wide.

In this brief treasure text, Padmasambhava prophesies the many ways in which he will reveal himself to disciples in the future. He encourages his students to pray to him continually and gives specific instructions on how to invoke him on the tenth day. The text concludes with a description of the destined revealer of this treasure, Ratna Lingpa.

A four-line prayer to Guru Padmasambhava for the elimination of obstacles and the fulfilment of wishes.

A four-line prayer to Orgyen Dorje Chang—the Vajradhara of Oḍḍiyāna—as the embodiment of all sources of refuge.

Rabjam Rinpoche composed this brief three-verse prayer to Padmasambhava when visiting the hidden land of Pemakö, sacred to the Guru.

Songs

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