Translations by Han Kop

English (34)


Han Kop

Further Information:

Han Kop began studying Tibetan in 2009. He has also studied at Dzongsar Shedra in Himachal Pradesh and served as an instructor and oral translator at the Rigpa Shedra in Nepal. From 2017 until 2020 he studied at Rangjung Yeshe Institute to obtain an MA in Translation, Textual Interpretation, and Philology. He is now the Director of the Longchen Nyingtik Project.

Texts translated into English by Han Kop

Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche

Dodrupchen Jigme Tenpe Nyima

Dodrupchen Jigme Trinle Özer

Dorje Dechen Lingpa

Dudjom Rinpoche

Fourth Dodrupchen Rinpoche

Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Thaye

Jamyang Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö

Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo

Jigme Lingpa

Yumka Dechen Gyalmo (yum ka bde chen rgyal mo), the Queen of Great Bliss, is the peaceful ḍākinī practice from the Longchen Nyingtik cycle. It features Yeshe Tsogyal in the form of a wisdom ḍākinī.

A simple rite of confession to amend any impairments and breakages of samaya and to purify actions that upset the dharma protectors.

Jigme Lingpa wrote this prayer recalling his own life and liberation at the request of the First Dodrupchen, Jigme Trinlé Özer (1745–1821). The prayer includes a summary of his previous lives, as well as his most important accomplishments and qualities, when—as he puts it—he emphasized the positive.

Part of the Longchen Nyingtik cycle, this Vajrasattva guru yoga is entitled 'Cultivating the Pure Realm of Abhirati (or Manifest Joy)' but is often known simply as 'Dorsem Ngön-ga' (Abhirati Vajrasattva). It includes all the standard elements of visualization, offering, mantra recitation and receiving empowerment.

This brief liturgy for invoking the inspiration power, or blessings, of the eight vidyādharas (rig 'dzin brgyad) of India was extracted from ‘A Precious Casket: A Framework for Accomplishment, from the Ocean-like Assembly of Awesome Ones’ (dpal chen bka' 'dus rgya mtsho las/ sgrub pa'i khog 'bubs rin po che'i za ma tog).

Further clarifications on the bodily maṇḍala (lus dkyil) of Yumka Dechen Gyalmo including the correspondence between external and internal sacred places, composed at the request of the female disciple Palding Jetsünma (alias Lhading Jetsün) of Gyangru.

This guru yoga, composed by the master himself, includes invocation and prayer, the seven-branch offering, mantra recitation and receiving of the four empowerments.

A succinct guide to the ḍākinī practice of Yumka Dechen Gyalmo, or Queen of Great Bliss, including details concerning necessary preparations and details of the visualization.

A short prayer to the lineage of Palchen Düpa, the wrathful yidam practice of Longchen Nyingtik, including supplementary verses composed by the Third Dodrupchen, Jigme Tenpe Nyima.

Jigme Lingpa describes how the cycle of Yumka Dechen Gyalmo was first revealed to him by a ḍākinī, while he was on pilgrimage in Drakyi Yangdzong in 1773.

The sādhana of Dukngal Rangdrol (sdug bsngal rang grol), 'Natural Liberation of Suffering', is the Avalokiteśvara practice from the Longchen Nyingtik that is classed either as a peaceful yidam or as the secret-level guru practice from the peaceful, male-vidyādhara section of the cycle.

This fire offering for Yuma Dechen Gyalmo, the main ḍākinī practice of Longchen Nyingtik, can be adapted to any of the four activities: pacifying, enriching, magnetizing or wrathful subjugation.

Karma Chakme

Minling Terchen Gyurme Dorje

Orgyen Tobgyal Rinpoche